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Back Bay | Beacon Hill | Brookline | Cambridge / Somerville | Downtown | Dorchester |
JP / Roslindale | North End / Charlestown | South End | And Beyond... | Destinations
Back Bay

Behind the Boston Common lay a bay of marshy flats, swelling with high tide twice each day. The city beyond was bustling and busy, crowded with an ideally American population of laborers, aristocrats, politicians, socialites…the whole of a city that had been born of idealism and...

Beacon Hill

The revolution was over. The beacon that sat atop the highest hill in Boston was no longer needed to warn residents of invasion. John Singleton Copley owned pasture land on the South slope of this highest hill, and one fell sale provided Charles Bulfinch the opportunity to...

Brookline

Rural and picturesque, the Muddy River Hamlet sat just outside of Boston. The land was parceled out to residents as farmland, and a community developed alongside the livestock and crops. From its small beginnings, this aptly named Hamlet grew rapidly, incorporating roads, a self-sufficient system of government and the independence to become a town...

Cambridge/Somerville

The Puritans landed in Massachusetts Bay in 1630, but there was discord among some of the 700-odd passengers about where they should establish the capital of their new settlement. Thus, Boston and Cambridge initiated their history of civilized rivalry. Newtowne, as Cambridge was originally known, offered each family a house lot in the village, fields for...

Downtown

British ships landed in what would become Boston Harbor, but was then a Native American trading post. John Winthrop understood the potential of the Harbor to be a significant, or at least effective, port for his burgeoning community, and it didn’t take long for a shipbuilding industry to emerge. The British traded goods with the new colony — finished wares from...

Dorchester

In the summer of 1614, Captain John Smith entered Boston Harbor and landed a boat with eight men on the Dorchester shore (today known as South Boston). Dorchester Avenue is the major neighborhood spine, running in a south-north line through all of Dorchester, the southern part of which is primarily a residential area...

Jamaica Plain/Roslindale

Named after Jamaica Pond in the 1640s, Jamaica Plain, or JP, grew up amidst torrential change. JP was a rural family settlement upon establishment, home to the massive “summer cottages” of Boston’s wealthiest families in the 1850s, a center for breweries and industry by 1896, a lush green annex of Boston at the turn of that century, and the...

North End/Charlestown

The Island of North Boston was not an island at all, but a small peninsula home to nothing more than a few estates, a pasture, a field, and a solitary wooden windmill. Naturally, though, the harborbound peninsula was an ideal location for commercial and residential development…roads, warehouses, mansions and businesses soon...

South End

The demand was great, and Charles Bulfinch was commissioned to create another neighborhood for the swelling Boston population. The Shawmut Peninsula linked the city to the mainland, and Bulfinch orchestrated a grid of streets surrounding a park on this unremarkable slip of land. The South End was beautiful, green and accessible, and the...

And Beyond....

The ‘burbs of Boston have most certainly done their share to keep up with the city they surround. Name an event in American history; it’s almost a sure bet that its origins can be traced to what is now known as “the Greater Boston area.” Encompassing rocky Atlantic seashores, rolling farmlands and picturesque town centers, “beyond” Boston has also...

Destinations

To think about New England is to see it, hear it and smell it all at once. To feel it recalls legends of winters frozen, summers sweltering, and the miraculous springs and falls between. But to taste New England is something else entirely. To taste New England is to taste the past and present of America — the Colonial settlers, the expansion of a nation,

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